Danes less secure about cybercrime

Only 22% of people living in Denmark worry about becoming a victim of cybercrime. This is one of the findings of a study conducted on behalf of Danske Bank. Despite this relatively low level of concern, only a third of people in Denmark think that they and their family are well protected against cybercrime.

Although residents of Denmark feel the greatest level of insecurity when they use their credit card on websites they do not know and when they buy goods from persons they do not meet physically, Danske Bank has seen an increase in the number of telephone fraud cases. Despite the increasing number of cases, the analysis shows that only 21% of those living in Denmark find it likely that they will become a victim of cybercrime at some point.


We often believe what we’re told, particularly when what we’re being told comes from an authority – regardless of whether this is a public authority or the bank. It is of course a good thing that we trust each other. But in these cases, it makes us extremely vulnerable. And the outcome can be can be costly when it concerns telephone fraud or any other type of fraud.

Ketil Clorius

Head of Fraud Management, Danske Bank



According to Ketil Clorius, Head of Fraud Management at Danske Bank, people in Denmark, at times, have a great sense of trust in authority. “We often believe what we’re told, particularly when what we’re being told comes from an authority – regardless of whether this is a public authority or the bank,” says Ketil Clorius and continues:

“It’s of course a good thing that we trust each other. But in these cases, it makes us extremely vulnerable. And the outcome can be can be costly when it concerns telephone fraud or any other type of fraud.”

New type of cybercrime on the rise
Besides telephone fraud, fraudsters have exploited the corona pandemic by adopting another type of cybercrime – namely web-based investment fraud. Investment fraudsters trick people into thinking that they can profit from a fantastic investment online. They are often lured with the promise of incredible profits and investment in crypto currency, bitcoins, oil and securities.

“During the corona pandemic, many people are at home more often than usual, and that means they’ve got more time to spend looking at offers online. We actually expect to see an increase of almost 70% in web-based investment fraud by the end of the year,” says Ketil Clorius.




Knowledge as a precaution

In Denmark, 60% of people feel inadequately protected against cybercrime while only 32% feel well protected. In general, knowledge, and lack of the same, is what makes people in Denmark feel well or inadequately protected against cybercrime.

Women in particular feel that they do not have sufficient knowledge about cybercrime, and they also feel that they find it difficult to understand how to become securely protected. A further 22% of people in Denmark – particularly 18-29 year olds and people with some form of higher education – think that becoming well protected requires too much effort and is too complicated.

“We know that a crucial factor in preventing cybercrime involves possessing a high level of knowledge. So for this reason, we’ve created the page Keep it safe, where you can find a lot of information, and where you can also download The Danish Consumer Council’s free digital-security app Mit digitale selvforsvar [My digital self-defence],” explains Ketil Clorius.

Becoming well protected against cybercrime
Generally, people in Denmark take a number of steps to protect themselves against cybercrime. First, they are particularly aware of suspicious emails and text messages, and many people do not answer the phone when they receive calls from unknown numbers. Furthermore, many people in Denmark are also careful when sharing personal information online.

Conversely, only relatively few people in Denmark change their passwords and avoid buying goods from persons without meeting them physically.

About the study

  • Conducted by YouGov for Danske Bank.
  • Based on a representative group of people living in Denmark aged 18+.
  • Based on more than 2,000 interviews held in February 2020.